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Abstract

When faculty study samples of student work, assignment prompts typically become part of the review. Two experienced learning community faculty from Skagit Valley College examined their students’ work with three questions in mind: whether the work was grounded in disciplinary insights; whether the work leveraged disciplinary knowledge to develop new understanding; and, whether the work was purposefully and critically aware. The analysis that emerged reaffirmed the complex nature of integration: disciplinary knowledge needs to be used, not possessed, and students need to first learn the fundamentals of integration followed by lots and lots of practice. These insights led the teaching team to make simple shifts in emphasis in assignment design and classroom practices that are described in the article. The original integrative assignment for their Philosophy of Religion and Introduction to Film learning community, Sacred Space/Sacred Time/Silver Screen, is included, along with the newly tweaked assignment and students’ self-reflections on the intellectual challenges associated with integrating two disciplines.

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